Category Archives: Uncategorized

British Butterfly Thrives on Climate Change

Climate change is reviving   a once rare British butterfly, according to a new article in the journal Science.   The brown argus butterfly was once scarce, but has doubled the size of its range in the last 20 years.   The

British Butterfly Thrives on Climate Change

Climate change is reviving   a once rare British butterfly, according to a new article in the journal Science.   The brown argus butterfly was once scarce, but has doubled the size of its range in the last 20 years.   The

Teen Lepidopterist Decodes the Secret to Butterfly Sense of Smell

Alexandra Sourakov has logged hours of research at the University of Florida’s butterfly house.  She used a combination of behavioral experiments and electorantennography (measurements of electrical current in butterfly antennae) to determine how butterflies find food.  Her most recent paper on foraging

Teen Lepidopterist Decodes the Secret to Butterfly Sense of Smell

Alexandra Sourakov has logged hours of research at the University of Florida’s butterfly house.  She used a combination of behavioral experiments and electorantennography (measurements of electrical current in butterfly antennae) to determine how butterflies find food.  Her most recent paper on foraging

Early spring meltdown a threat to butterflies and flowers

Spring has been coming early to the Rocky Mountains, and while warm weather may be good news for humans, it’s bad news for flowers and butterflies. A  long term study by Carol Boggs (Stanford University) and David Inouye (University of

Early spring meltdown a threat to butterflies and flowers

Spring has been coming early to the Rocky Mountains, and while warm weather may be good news for humans, it’s bad news for flowers and butterflies. A  long term study by Carol Boggs (Stanford University) and David Inouye (University of

Science Online 2012

This week Jess and I attended the Science Online 2012 conference in Raleigh.  This so -called  “un-conference” is designed to bring together scientists, science writers, educators, and bloggers of all stripes to learn about using the web for science communication.  The conference

Science Online 2012

This week Jess and I attended the Science Online 2012 conference in Raleigh.  This so -called  “un-conference” is designed to bring together scientists, science writers, educators, and bloggers of all stripes to learn about using the web for science communication.  The conference

Prehistoric Moths Show Their True Colors

Happy 2012 butterfly fans!  In order to better celebrate the future, we’re taking a  look back into the past: the ancient past.  The earliest known butterflies and moths evolved about 50 million years ago (although there is some evidence that

Prehistoric Moths Show Their True Colors

Happy 2012 butterfly fans!  In order to better celebrate the future, we’re taking a  look back into the past: the ancient past.  The earliest known butterflies and moths evolved about 50 million years ago (although there is some evidence that

New Atlas Maps all 441 Species of European Butterflies

Get excited, because the Distribution Atlas of Butterflies in Europe was released today, and butterfly scientists will be lining up around the block to get their hands on a copy.   The new atlas gives detailed maps of the ranges

New Atlas Maps all 441 Species of European Butterflies

Get excited, because the Distribution Atlas of Butterflies in Europe was released today, and butterfly scientists will be lining up around the block to get their hands on a copy.   The new atlas gives detailed maps of the ranges

Butterflies and Social Science

One of the really fun things about my fellowship  in Japan was meeting other students from different  fields.  One person who does especially cool work is my friend Annabel Vallard, who is a postdoctoral fellow at the Center for South

Butterflies and Social Science

One of the really fun things about my fellowship  in Japan was meeting other students from different  fields.  One person who does especially cool work is my friend Annabel Vallard, who is a postdoctoral fellow at the Center for South